Deathly Hallows and Broomsticks: Part one Giant Hallows

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A few years ago we were at Ikea and my wonderful partner in crime and all things crafty saw this bundle of sticks and said:

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“Hey, this would be a great tail piece of a broom, we just need to get a stick.”

So naturally we bought them and we have been on the hunt for a good broom handle stick since then. We tried looking around for fallen limbs and in time the bundle got moved to a corner out of sight but not forgotten. 

Skip ahead to a week ago, I was wandering unsupervised in Hobby Lobby and my little eye spied these 3 ct bundles of birch poles.



I saw the 40% off sign and stared at them for a moment and said “ooooooo perfect”. Naturally, I pulled all of the bundles they had out to look and see which was the best for our project (that I wasn’t even planning on doing this week but that’s how inspiration gets you). I couldn’t decide so I texted Joe to say that I had found the perfect thing for the broom, and sent him a picture to select one he thought would work best…then, another light bulb went on in my head.


If I bought 2 bundles, I would have enough to make a massive Deathly Hallows framework for above our garage. I would just need to get an ivy wreath. Long story short, (too late I know) I came home with enough to make one broom and one hallows, with one to spare.

While prepping the first four poles for the hallows (which I’ll address below) I kept thinking about the poor lonely bundle I didn’t get, all alone in the store safely hidden among the fake Christmas flowers and such. It needed a home I reasoned to myself, besides I could ALWAYS (ha) make another hallows or walking sticks.


I went back to the store. Now I have plenty to play with.

Now we have 3 bundles of birch poles to prep. We are going to break this down into a two part post. We will make the Giant Hallows in part one, and the broomstick in part two.

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Deathly Hallows material

chisel, green scrub pad, maybe a planer
box cutter I perfer the Husky brand or whittling type knife, sand paper
4 wooden poles
Wooden ivy/vine wreath
Polyurethane Natural coloring or stain of your choice.
Jute or cord
Screws
Drill and drill bits sized for screws you use


For starters we will go with the hallows first.
I picked four straightest poles and began to strip the outer loose bark off to reveal the hardwood beneath. This process took some time and elbow grease, but as I wasn’t doing anything important so I chose to do it by hand.

 Why?

Because I’m apparently insane and I love to do things the hard way.

These appear to be kiln dried and the bark was very attached to its home on the pole. About 6 hours later, with a chisel, box cutter, sand paper, green scrub pad and a planer I got the desired outcome. I could have left the bark on and lashed them together and secured them with screws, but I wanted more….


(Takes break to Sing Little Mermaid “I want more” song)


Peeling the bark off was not an easy process, like I said it took me hours. I make a cut along the pole and slid a box cutter into the groove, which loosened some of the bark. In the end, I pretty much used a chisel or my box cutter to shave/carve the bark off.



I especially love how the carving looked when I used the box cutter, I got these awesome little indentations which I think will look fantastic once I wipe a light clear coat on.

NOTE: please be very careful as all your tools are sharp and the wood is, well, hardwood. Just be careful always cut away from yourself, wear cutting gloves or work gloves if you prefer


Once I had the poles stripped I wiped them down with polyurethane Natural Wood stain and let it cure overnight. I then sized up which branch I wanted where and secured the frame work together using an assortment of knots. The frame we wrapped each corner with jute twine for a more rustic effect. We used shear lashings, and diagonal lashing. I had to break out the knot book and watch YouTube a few times to make sure we got the knots correct.


Joe broke out the trusty drill and pre-drilled holes for the screws because I wanted it to have extra support for the center wand portion. I did some lashing over the screw for effect.


Note the center and pole had to be trimmed just a bit to make it fit inside the triangle. We also attached the wand to the back side of the framework.


All that is left is to attach the wreath to the center and make a hanger. As mentioned before, I want to put this above the garage. I attached the wreath to the front of the framework by tying it down with jute on the back side so I was easy to secure.

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TaDa. Part two to be coming in a few weeks. Don’t forget to sign up for the giveaway! Giveaway ends 10/31/19.

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If this project inspires you to make your own please tag/share with me on Instagram, Facebook or Pinterest. I would love to see what you come up with.

Cheers! Sarah

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